Love Dogs... Love Nature

Dogs & birds around our winter coasts

 

A special place for all sorts of birds!  Oystercatcher_Andreas Trepte

Our dogs and flocks

During the autumn and winter you may have seen carrot-beaked flocks of black-and-white Oystercatchers around Poole Harbour, you'll often see them in nearby parks and on grassy verges too.  There are many other birds that overwinter around the harbour and other Dorset shorelines, some of them are rare species that are really struggling to survive. 

Thank you Andreas Trepte for giving permission for us to use his Oystercatcher photo - you can find more of his gorgeous photos at
https://www.photo-natur.net/

We can help the birds to survive and thrive and here's how

  • Don't let your dog chase flocks.  It may not seem like a big deal but if dogs run close to or chase flocks of birds that are overwintering or migrating it can affect their future chances of survival, especially if they are already exhausted or short of food.
  • Keep your distance.  Some birds are more flighty than others, and whilst for some a short disturbance may not do much harm for others it could be the final straw - and we can't tell which is which - so try to keep yourself and your dog at a reasonable distance away so that the flock does not have to take flight.

    Other things like bait digging, kayaking, fishing and all sorts of other activities can make them take flight - so it's not just us who are being asked to keep our distance with our dogs.
  • Download 'The Birds of Poole Harbour' leaflet below - it includes more information about the birds and about how you can help.  It also includes a great map of Poole Harbour with photos of the birds - and it just might help you with the anwers to the quiz below!

Jess, Rita & Wendy at South Beach, Studland

Jess snuffling around at one of the Studland Beaches with
Rita & Wendy - a refreshing wintry walk!

Can you spare 2 minutes (really! 2 mins!) to do a Dorset Dogs survey - your help would be greatly appreciated!

Just 7 quick questions!

Please take the survey if you haven't done it before and also do it if you did the survey last year - it's an update.

It's relevant for anyone who ever visits any part of the coast around Poole Harbour or the Studland beaches - (eg Studland beaches, Arne, Lytchett Bay, Holes Bay, Baiter, Whitecliff,
Hamworthy beach, Bramble Bush or Brands Bay - or anywhere else around Poole Harbour)

Here it is! Just click on the link: www.surveymonkey.com/studlandbeaches&pooleharbour

All year round we can see some fabulous birds around Poole Harbour, - Cormorants perched on the skeletal wrecks of little boats, Little Egrets stalking the mud flats with their surprising yellow feet, swans massing in floating drifts across quieter bays or - if we're lucky - rare terns mobbing and diving right next to the Sandbanks Ferry. 

You can watch birds on Brownsea Island Lagoon live webcam here: /webcam.html

 Birds are in for the autumn right now! - check out http://www.birdsofpooleharbour.co.uk/sightings

Quiz - Can you guess which is which?

1.  Little Egret   2.  Mediterranean Gull  3. Common Tern  4.  Shelduck

5.  Oystercatcher 6.  Black-tailed Godwit  7.  Avocet 

  BTGAvt

Sdk CT
 

MGLEOystercatcher_Andreas Trepte

 

Check your answers on the  leaflet download below - where you'll find the photos above, which are reproduced with kind permission of northeastwildlife.co.uk
apart from the Oystercatcher which is Andreas Trepte - www.photonatur.net

 

Useful links for further information:

Download: Birds of Poole Harbour leaflet - information specially put together for you and your dog!  The leaflet shows you some of the birds, the areas that are particularly sensitive for them and tells us how we can help them to survive.

Poole Harbour Trails - find out about walking around Poole Harbour at http://www.pooleharbourtrails.org.uk

Studland National Trust beaches

if you would like a printed copy of the Birds of Poole Harbour leaflet please email dorsetdogs@dorsetcc.gov.uk

Download: Bird Disturbance Study Poole Harbour (2 MB) - scientific study by Footprint Ecology      
                     Bird Disturbance Study Poole Harbour - Map Annex (5 MB)

Exhausted hungry birds